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Cultural Dance Trends Series - Episode 3 by World Dance Apparel

Written by Karol Moreno

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Posted on August 16 2022

So, are you enjoying our series on world-wide dance culture? Great! Today we are here with our 3rd episode of this series. If you haven’t explored the first 2 episodes yet, you may find the links below at the end of this blog. So, without wasting any time let’s move forward to our article.

In the previous blog, we shared the dance culture of each country starting with the alphabet letter 'B'. In this blog episode, we’re going to cover all the countries starting with the alphabet 'C'. So, just read, enjoy this amazing information. Our writers searched their best to provide you a great piece of content. So, let’s dive in

Cultural Dance of Cambodia

Romvong Dance

Romvong Dance

Romvong is a type of Southeast Asian dance where both females and males dance in a circle. It is a popular folk-dance in Xishuangbanna (China), Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia and Thailand. It is a slow round dance continuously moving in a circular manner, and incorporates graceful hand movements and simple footwork. Both men and women participate in the same circle. The circular dance style is claimed as a traditional dance in the four countries of the region where it is often part of traditional festivities, popular celebrations and modern parties.

Apsara Dance

Apsara Dance

The Apsara robam is played by a woman, sewn into tight-fitting traditional dance costumes, whose graceful, sinuous gestures are codified to narrate classical myths or religious stories.

Chhayam Dance

Chhayam Dance

Chhayam is a traditional Khmer musical dance. It features the long-drum, clashing hand-held cymbals, wooden clackers, and other noisemakers made of commonly found materials. The performers show off in comic masks and exaggerated hair styles and make-up. Communal and spontaneous, the combination of drumming, comic exhibitions and animated vernacular call-and-response vocals are characteristics of Chhayam.

Cultural Dance of Canada

Canada is country rich in multicultural heritage and culture, part of which is dance. The subject of national dance in Canada is none. But unofficially they have a specific Canadian dance. Other than few dances are:

Canadian Step Dance

Canadian Step Dance

Canadian step dance, also known as Maritimes step dance, is a style of step dance in Canada, stemming from European origins including France, Scotland and Ireland. Canadian step dancing involves fast dancing to fiddle music using shoes with taps designed to accentuate the dancer's rhythmical, drumming foot movements. Dancers generally require little dance space to perform their routines. Some styles of Canadian step dancing include upper-body postures that are relatively relaxed compared with older step dance styles, allowing occasional arm movements that flow with the rhythm of the dance, or hands on hips.

Red River Jig for Métis

Red River Jig dance

The Red River Jig is a traditional dance and accompanying fiddle tune, culturally relevant to both the Canadian Métis and the First Nations. The dance’s performers and fiddlers currently and historically includes individuals identifying as First Nations, French Canadian, or Scottish Canadians, as well as others involved in the expansive 19th century fur trade. The origins of the dance can be traced to traditional dances of the First Nations, French, English, Scots, and Orcadian peoples, from whom the Métis Nation descended. The name is also in reference to the Red River of the North, which forms the border between North Dakota and Minnesota (USA) and flows north through Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada before emptying into Hudson's Bay.

Jingle Dance

Jingle Dance

Jingle dance have the First Nations and Native American women's pow wow regalia dance apparel. North Central College associate professor Matthew Krystal notes, in his book, Indigenous Dance and Dancing Indian: Contested Representation in the Global Era, that "Whereas men's styles offer Grass Dance as a healing themed dance, women may select Jingle Dress Dance." The regalia worn for the dance is a jingle dress, which includes ornamentation with multiple rows of metal, such as cones, that create a jingling sound as the dancer moves.

Fancy Dance and First Nations Tribal Dance

Fancy Dance

Fancy dance and First Nations tribal dance is a style of dance some believe was originally created by members of the Ponca tribe in the 1920s and 1930s, in an attempt to preserve their culture and religion. It is loosely based on the War dance. Fancy dance was considered appropriate to be performed for visitors to reservations and at "Wild West" shows. But today, fancy dancers can be seen at many powwows across the nation and even the world.

Cultural Dance of Cape Verde

Coladeira Dance

Coladeira Dance

The coladeira is a music genre from the Cape Verde islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. It is characterized by a variable tempo, a 2-beat bar, and a harmonic structure based in a cycle of fifths. The lyrics structure is organized in strophes that alternate with a refrain. The tone is generally joyful and themes often include social criticism. Coladeira also refers to a ballroom dance done in pairs accompanied by the music.

Batuque Dance

Batuque Dance

As a dance, the traditional batuque follows a precise ritual. In a batuque session, a group of performers gather themselves in a circle in a scenario that is called terreru. This scenario does not have to be a precise location, it may be a back yard in a house or it may be a public square, for instance.

Cultural Dance of Chile

Cueca Dance

Cueca Dance

Cueca is a family of musical styles and associated dances from Chile, Argentina, and Bolivia. In Chile, the cueca holds the status of national dance, where it was officially declared as such by the Pinochet dictatorship on September 18, 1979.

Rapa Nui: Sau-Sau Dance

Sau-Sau Dance

Most of the Easter Island music and dances are of Polynesian origin. The Rapa Nui ancestral dances have been lost or merged, though it’s still possible to find indigenous music rooted in the orally-transmitted legends that are songs and dances dedicated to the gods, spirit warriors, the rain or love. In Sau-Sau, couples come together and apart with quick hip movements. In this dance, the islanders, especially the women, wear colorful feathers that modern groups are incorporating more and more.

Cultural Dance of China

Yangge Dance

Yangge Dance

Yangge is a form of Chinese folk dance developed from a dance known in the Song dynasty as Village Music. It is very popular in northern China and is one of the most representative form of folk arts. It is popular in both the countryside and cities in northern China. It is especially popular among older people. Crowds of people will go out into the street in the evening and dance together in a line or a circle formation.

Lion Dance

Lion Dance

Lion dance is a form of traditional dance in Chinese culture and other Asian countries in which performers mimic a lion's movements in a lion costume to bring good luck and fortune. The lion dance is usually performed during the Chinese New Year and other Chinese traditional, cultural and religious festivals. It may also be performed at important occasions such as business opening events, special celebrations or wedding ceremonies, or may be used to honour special guests by the Chinese communities.

Dragon Dance

Dragon Dance

Dragon dance is a form of traditional dance and performance in Chinese culture. Like the lion dance, it is most often seen in festive celebrations. The dance is performed by a team of experienced dancers who manipulate a long flexible giant puppet of a dragon using poles positioned at regular intervals along the length of the dragon. The dance team simulates the imagined movements of this river spirit in a sinuous, undulating manner.

Cultural Dance of Colombia

Vallenato Dance

Vallenato Dance

Vallenato is a popular folk music genre from Colombia. It primarily comes from its Caribbean region. Vallenato literally means "born in the valley". The valley influencing this name is located between the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and the Serranía de Perijá in north-east Colombia. The name also applies to the people from the city where this genre originated: Valledupar.

Cumbia Dance

Cumbia Dance

Cumbia refers to a number of musical rhythms and folk dance traditions of Latin America, generally involving musical and cultural elements from Amerindians, Africans enslaved during colonial times, and Europeans.

Cultural Dance of Cook Islands

Ura Dance

Ura Dance

Ura is one of the popular traditional dances of the Cook Islands, a Maori sacred ritual usually performed by a female who moves her body to tell a story, accompanied by intense drumming by at least five drummers. Moving the hips, legs and hands give off different gestures to the audience to tell a tale, typically related to the natural landscape such as the ocean and birds and flowers, but also feelings of love and sadness.

To perform the ura, women typically use dancewears including a pareu and a kikau (grass) skirt, with flowers and shell headbands and necklaces. Men during the dance are said to "vigorously flap their knees in a semi-crouched position while holding their upper bodies steady", and the dance costumes men wear are kikau skirts and headbands. The finest performances of the Ura are put on in Rarotonga.

Cultural Dance of Costa Rica

Punto Guanacasteco Dance

Punto Guanacasteco Dance

The Punto Guanacasteco or Punto Costa Rican is an indigenous folk dance from Costa Rica, considered the country's national dance. It is also known as "dance or they are loose", since the couple dances loosely.

Cultural Dance of Croatia

Linđo Dance

Linđo Dance

Linđo is a popular dance of Dubrovnik and the Dubrovnik region of Croatia. It is danced to the accompaniment of lijerica, which came from the Eastern Mediterranean in the late 18th century and spread on the Adriatic coast in the 19th century.

Cultural Dance of Cuba

Danzón Dance

Danzón Dance

Danzón is the official musical genre and dance of Cuba. It is also an active musical form in Mexico, and is much loved in Puerto Rico as well. Written in 2-4 time, the danzón is a slow, formal partner dance, requiring set footwork around syncopated beats, and incorporating elegant pauses while the couples stand listening to virtuoso instrumental passages, as characteristically played by a charanga or típica ensemble.

Rumba Dance

Rumba Dance

Rumba is a secular genre of Cuban music involving dance, percussion, and song. It originated in the northern regions of Cuba, mainly in urban Havana and Matanzas, during the late 19th century. It is based on African music and dance traditions, namely Abakuá and yuka, as well as the Spanish-based coros de clave. According to Argeliers León, rumba is one of the major "genre complexes" of Cuban music, and the term rumba complex is now commonly used by musicologists. This complex encompasses the three traditional forms of rumba, as well as their contemporary derivatives and other minor styles.

Cultural Dance of Cyprus

Sousta Dance

Sousta Dance

Sousta is a Greek folk dance, performed at weddings as an activity of courtship between husband and wife. It originates from Ancient Greece, and holds prominence in Dodecanese Islands, and broader Aegean region. It is the second most common Greek dance, after the Syrtos, with many Greek islands and villages adopting their own version. The performance of the dance reflects various gender roles, inter-played with values of romance and marriage.

Tatsia Dance

Tatsia Dance

Tatsia is a dance of skill, combining the hand and body in non-stop movement. The dancer holds a sieve in his hand with the four main fingers on the top of the inside perimeter of the sieve, while his thumb is on the top of the outside. Then an assistant of the dancer (usually a woman), or even the dancer himself, puts a glass of wine on the bottom of the inside perimeter of the sieve. The wine within the glass must not exceed the middle of the glass. Then the dancer performs a variety of moves with his hands holding the sieve, as he is dancing to the rhythm. The dancer can put in the sieve as many glasses of wine as he likes. In order to put more than three though a bigger sieve is required as well as a small piece of wood to put on the three base glasses.

Turkish Cypriot Folk Dances

Turkish Cypriot Folk Dances

Turkish-Cypriot folk dances have many different names. They are named according to dance style, musicians, dancers, regions, and themes. The names of some of the folk dances are `Karşilama', `Kaşikli Oyunlari' (dances with wooden spoons), sword and shield dance, knife dance, and glass dance. Some of these dances are solely either for man or woman, whereas others are for both. Few examples are kozan, ciftetelli, testi, etc

Cultural Dance of Czech Republic

Polka Dance

Polka Dance

The polka is originally a Czech dance having traditional dance dresses and genre of dance music familiar throughout all of Europe and the Americas. It originated in the middle of the nineteenth century in German and Austrian Influenced Bohemia, now part of the Czech Republic. The polka remains a popular folk music genre in many western countries, and is performed by many folk artists.

Redowa Dance

Redowa Dance

A redowa is a dance of Czech origin with turning, leaping waltz steps that was most popular in Victorian Era European ballrooms. A basic redowa step contains one long reaching step and two small leap-steps. The long reaching step can be danced on either the 1 or the 2 of each bar of music, depending on what feels best with the tune that is playing.

Cultural Dance – Episode 1: https://worlddanceapparel.com/blogs/how-to-blogs/cultural-dance-trends-series-episode-1

Cultural Dance Episode 1

Cultural Dance – Episode 2: https://worlddanceapparel.com/blogs/how-to-blogs/cultural-dance-trends-series-episode-2

Cultural Dance Episode 2

Last Words

So, we hope you enjoyed this episode. We tried our best to cover all the countries starting with the letter ‘C’ in this blog episode. To explore the 1st two episodes you may find the links above.

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