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Cultural Dance Trends Episode 6 by World Dance Apparel

Written by Karol Moreno

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Posted on September 22 2022

Patience is over! We are here again to concatenate our blog series from where we left. Last time, we talked about the countries which names start from G & H. In this specific blog episode we are going to share some countries that names start from 'I' alphabets. If you have missed any episode, you may get the links at the end of this episode.

In our blogs. we try to cover cultural dances and special type of dance costumes of different countries around the globe. So, you can explore something new about dance world. Well, without wasting anytime, let’s take a start with the Iceland country.

Cultural Dance of Iceland

Vikivaki Dance

Vikivaki Dance

Vikivaki is an ancient round dance that was performed at festivals in the Scandinavian countries from the Middle Ages to the present day. The word vikivaki is used for dances, poems sung during the dance, or "joy" - the entertainment in which this dance is performed. The most popular type of vikivaki today is undoubtedly the dance that takes place every year on the last weekend of July in Ólafsvaku in the Faroe Islands to the fairy tale Orminn Langa.

Vikivaki are often referred to simply as "dance" in sources and poems, "danskvæi". Vikivaki is a circle dance, in which participants hold hands or shoulders and do two dance steps to the left and one to the right, with different criteria, such as stamping on the floor every 8 steps. When tall tales are sung, the feet tend to be more grounded when it comes to dramatic moments in the story.

Cultural Dance of India

Bharatnatyam Dance

Bharatnatyam Dance

Bharatanatyam is an important form of classical Indian dance from the state of Tamil Nadu. The dance form is briefly mentioned as "Bharata Natya" in the Kannada text Manasollasa written by Someshwara III. It has thrived in temples and courts in South India since ancient times. It is one of the eight widely recognized classical Indian dance forms and expresses the religious themes and spiritual ideas of South India, especially Shaivism, Vaishnavism, Shaktism and Hinduism collectively.

Kuchipudi Dance

Kuchipudi Dance

Kuchipudi is a dramatic dance performance, with its roots in the ancient Hindu Sanskrit text of the Natya Shastra. It developed as a religious art associated with travel, temples and spiritual beliefs, like all the great classical dances in India. Evidence of Kuchipudi's existence in an archaic version can be found in 10th-century copperplate inscriptions and in 15th-century texts such as the Machupalli Kaifat.

The Kuchipudi tradition holds that Tirtha Narayana Yati - Sanyas to convince Advaita Vedanta, and his disciple, an orphan named Siddhendra Yogi, founded and organized the modern version of Kuchipudi in the 17th century. Widely developed as a Vaishnavi tradition addressed to Krishna, Kuchipudi is known as Bhagavata Mela in Thanjavur.

Kathak Dance

Kathak Dance

Kathak is one of the eight major classical Indian dance forms. It is the classical dance form of Uttar Pradesh. The origin of Kathak is traditionally attributed to the itinerant poets of ancient Northern India known as Kathakhar or storytellers. The term Kathak is derived from the Vedic Sanskrit word Katha which means 'story', and Kathakar which means 'one who tells a story' or 'related to stories'. Wandering Kathakars tell stories from great epics and ancient legends through dance, song and music.

Kathak dancers tell different stories through the intense movements of their hands and feet, their body movements and flexibility, but most importantly through their facial expressions.

Kathak developed during the Bhakti movement, notably incorporating the childhood and stories of the Hindu god Krishna, as well as independently in the courts of the North Indian kingdoms. During the Mughal rule, emperors were patrons of Kathak dance and actively promoted it in their royal court.

Kathak offerings include Urdu gazelles and commonly used implements brought with them during the Mughal period. As a result, it is the only classical Indian dance form with Persian elements.

Odissi Dance

Odissi Dance

Odissi is an ancient classical Indian dance that originated in the temples of Odisha, a coastal state in eastern India. The Odyssey in its history was mostly performed by women and expressed religious stories and spiritual ideas, especially Vaishnavism through songs he wrote and composed according to raga and tala in music from the Odyssey of the ancient state poets.

Depictions of the Odyssey have also expressed ideas about other traditions, such as those related to Hindu gods Shiva and Surya, as well as Hindu gods (Shaktism).

The theoretical foundations of the Odissi can be traced back to the ancient Sanskrit text Natya Shastra, and its presence in ancient times is evidenced by dance forms in the carvings of Kalingan temples, archaeological sites associated with Hinduism (Sanatana Dharma), Buddhism and Jainism. It was suppressed under British rule. Indians have protested oppression followed by the revival, reconstruction and expansion since India gained independence from colonial rule.

Sattriya Dance

Sattriya Dance

Sattriya or Sattriya Nritya, is a great classical Indian dance. It is a theatrical dance use dance  performance costume that originated in the Krishna-focused Vaishnavism monasteries in Assam, and is attributed to the 15th-century Bhakti movement scholar and Saint Mapurush Srimanta Sankardev.

Manipuri Dance

Manipuri Dance

Manipuri dance, also called Manipuri Raas Leela, is one of the eight major classical Indian dance forms, originating from the state of Manipur. The dance form is infused with the devotional themes of Radha-Krishna's Madhura Raas and has soft eyes and gentle, calm body movements. Facial expressions are usually peaceful and express bhakti rasa or the emotion of devotion whether the dancer is Hindu or not.

The dance form is based on the Hindu scriptures of Vaishnavism and is associated exclusively with the worship of Radha and Krishna. It is a performance of Lord Krishna's divine love dance with the goddess Radha and the cowboys of Vrindavan known as Raas Leela.

Mohiniyattam Dance

Mohiniyattam Dance

Mohiniyattam is a classical Indian dance form that developed and remains popular in Kerala. Kathakali is another classical dance form in Kerala. The name of the dance Mohinitum is derived from the word Mohini - a charming historical incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu, who helps good to overcome evil by developing his feminine powers.

Kathakali Dance

Kathakali Dance

Kathakali is an important form of classical Indian dance. It's a bit of an artistic "game", but it includes elaborate colorful makeup, dance apparels and face masks traditionally worn by the portrayed dancers. It originated in the Malayalam-speaking area of ​​southwestern Kerala and is practiced and enjoyed by almost all Malayali people.

Bhangra Dance

Bhangra Dance

Bhangra is a type of traditional Punjabi folk dance originating from the Sialkot region of Punjab. In a typical performance, many dancers perform powerful kicks, jumps and body flexions - often with lifted, arm or shoulder movements - accompanied by short songs called boulian and especially to the rhythm of the dhal (double head drum). Struck with a heavy club on one end and a lighter stick on the other, the dhol gives the music synchronous notes (accents over weak rhythms), a swinging rhythmic figure that has generally remained the hallmark of bhangra music.

Garba Dance

Garba Dance

Garba is a dance form originating from the state of Gujarat in India. The name is derived from the Sanskrit term Garbha. Many traditional garba ceremonies are performed around a centrally lit lamp or image or statue of the goddess Shakti. Traditionally performed during the nine-day Hindu festival of Navarātrī or a depiction of the goddess, a Durga (also called Amba) is placed in the center of concentric rings as an object of worship.

Dandiya Dance

Dandiya Dance

Raas or Dandiya Raas is a social and religious folk dance originating from the Indian state of Gujarat and popularly performed in the Navaratri festival. The dance is also performed in the Marwar district of Rajasthan. The origin of the name Dandiya-Raas is in Sanskrit. Dandiya-raas exist in various forms, including team competitive form. The dance style is now in both competitive and traditional form.

Ghoomar Dance

Ghoomar Dance

Ghoomar or Ghumar is a traditional folk dance of Rajasthan. It was the Bhil tribe who did it to worship the goddess Sarasvati, who was later adopted by other communities in Rajasthan. The dance is usually performed by veiled women wearing flowing dresses called ghaghara, a special kind of danve dress.

The dance usually involves the performers stepping in and out of a large circle in turn. The word ghumna describes the circular movement of the dancers and is the basis of the word gumar. According to the traditional ritual, a newly married bride is expected to dance a gumar when she welcomes him to her new marital home.

Cheraw Dance

Cheraw Dance

The Cheraw people, also known as the Saraw or Saura, were a Siwan-speaking tribe native to the southeastern forests of the Piedmont region of North Carolina, near the Surattown Mountains east of Mount Pilot and north of the Yadkin River. They lived in villages near the Catawba River. The first European and African contact with Hernando de Soto's expedition dates back to 1540. Early explorer John Lawson brought them to the Confederation of Greater Eastern Siwan, which he called the "Isu Nation".

Bihu Dance

Bihu Dance

Bihu is an indigenous folk dance of the Indian state of Assam, associated with the Bihu festival and an important part of Assamese culture. Pehu dancers are performed in a group, usually made up of young men and women, and the dance style is characterized by quick steps, quick hand movements. The traditional dance costume of the dancers is colorful and centered on the theme of the color red, which represents joy and vitality.

Chhau Dance

Chhau Dance

The Chhau dance, also known as the Chhou dance, is a semi-classical Indian dance with martial and folk traditions. It is found in three styles named after where it was made namely Purulia Chhau from West Bengal, Seraikella Chhau from Jharkhand and Mayurbhanj Chhau from Odisha. The dance ranges from a celebration of martial arts, acrobatics and athletics performed in ceremonial folk dance themes to an organized dance with religious themes found in Shaivism, Shaktism and Vaishnavism.

Yakshagana Dance

Yakshagana Dance

Yakshagana is a traditional theater developed in Dakshina Kannada, Udupi, Uttara Kannada, Shimoga and western parts of Chikmagalur, Karnataka and Kasaragod districts of Kerala, which combines dance, music, dialogue, costumes, makeup, dance shoes and theatrical techniques in a unique style . and shape. It is believed to have developed from pre-classical music and theater during the period of the Bhakti movement. Sometimes it's just called "ata" or aa (meaning "theatrical").

Cultural Dance of Indonesia

Legong Dance

Legong Dance

Legong is a Balinese dance form. It is a sophisticated dance form characterized by intricate finger movements, intricate foot movements, expressive gestures and facial expressions. Traditionally, ballerinas were girls who had not yet reached puberty. Around the age of five, they begin rigorous training. These dancers were highly regarded in society and usually became the wives of royals or wealthy merchants. After the wedding, they stopped dancing. However, in present-day Indonesia, dancers can be of all ages; Men's dance performance in women's fashion is also recorded.

Pendet Dance

Pendet Dance

Pendet is a traditional dance from Bali, Indonesia in which flower offerings are made to purify a temple or scene as a precursor to other ceremonies or dances. Usually young girls perform the Pendet, holding holders with petals, a handful of which are thrown in the air at various times during a dance. The Pendet can be seen as a salute to welcome the audience and invite the spirits to enjoy a show. It is one of the oldest Balinese dances, although its current form was codified in the 1950s.

Barong Ket Dance

Barong Ket Dance

A barong is a tiger-like creature in Balinese mythology from Bali, Indonesia. He is the king of the spirits, the leader of the armies of good and the enemy of Rangda, the queen of the demons and the mother of all soul protectors in the mythical traditions of Bali. The battle between Barong and Rangda appears in the Barong dance to represent the eternal struggle between good and evil.

Ronggeng Dance

Ronggeng Dance

Ronggeng is a type of Javanese dance where couples exchange verses while dancing to the music of rabab, or violin and gong. Ronggeng probably comes from Java in Indonesia. Ronggeng has probably been present in Java since ancient times, with reliefs in the Karmawibhanga section of Borobudur from the 8th century showing the scene of a traveling entertainment company of musicians and dancers.

Kebyar duduk Dance

Kebyar duduk Dance

Kebyar Duduk is a traditional Balinese dance created by Balinese man Ketut Marya and first performed in public in 1925. Inspired by the development of the fast gamelan gong kebyar, kebyar duduk takes its name from seated and semi-sitting poses performed by the dancers. be taken. It does not convey a story, but an interpretation.

Saman Dance

Saman Dance

Saman (or Thousand Hands Dance) is one of the most popular dances in Indonesia. Originating from the Gayo ethnic group of Gayo Lues, Aceh Province, Indonesia, it is usually played to celebrate important occasions. The dance is distinguished by its fast rhythm and the harmony of the dancers. These two elements are the main characters of saman and are part of why saman is so popular and widely practiced in Indonesia, in addition to being relatively easy to learn.

On November 24, 2011, Aceh's traditional Saman dance was officially recognized by UNESCO as an intangible cultural heritage in urgent need of protection.

Cultural Dance of Iraq

Kurdish Dance

Kurdish Dance

Kurdish dances are a group of traditional dances among the Kurds. It is a circle dance form, often adding one or two dancers to the geometric center of the circle dance. Sometimes the musicians play a drum or a double-reed wind instrument known as a zurna, and often dancers wrapped in handkerchiefs accompany the group of dancers.

The dancers, the women in general, as well as the men on occasion, wear traditional Kurdish dance clothes. Kurds dance on many occasions such as Kurdish holidays, birthdays, New Year, Nowruz, weddings and other celebrations. The dances have many names, often linked to local names and traditions.

Chobi Dance

Chobi Dance

Assyrian folk dances are groups of dances performed by Assyrians around the world, usually on occasions such as weddings, community celebrations and other joyous occasions. Assyrian folk dances mainly consist of circle dances such as ballet that are performed in a line, which can be straight, curved, or both.

Most dances allow an un limited number of participants, with the exception of the Sound Dance, which requires a maximum of three. Assyrian dances range from weak to strong, depending on the mood and tempo of the song.

Khigga Dance

Khigga Dance

Khigga is an Assyrian folk dance style in which several dancers hold hands and form a semicircle or curved line. There are many styles of feet that dancers perform. It is believed that she has been dancing for thousands of years. It is one of the most common and simple Assyrian folk dances and is usually performed at weddings and other happy occasions. In general, the khigga accompanies a moderate dance beat and is usually performed to Assyrian folk/pop music.

Cultural Dance of Iran

Persian Dance

Persian Dance

Dancing in Iran or Iranian dances are dance styles that are native to Iran. Types of dance in Iran vary by region, culture and language of the locals, and can range from sophisticated recreations of beautiful courtly dances to energetic folk dances. The population of Iran includes many ethnic groups, such as Kurds, Azerbaijanis, Turkmen, Jews, Armenians, and Georgians, as well as many Iranian tribal groups that are found within Iran's borders. Modern Iran.

Each historical group, region and era is associated with specific dance styles. Raghs (also spelled Raqs) is the Arabic word for dance, roughly the word for dance in Persian, as the Persian word for dance, paykubi, is no longer commonly used. It is also the Azerbaijani word for dance (Reqs). The Kurdish word for dance is Halperke, and the Lurs of Lorestan use the word Bākhten (or Bāzee) for dance.

Cultural Dance of Ireland

Irish Step Dance

Irish Step Dance

Irish dancing is a style of performance dancing that has its roots in traditional Irish dance. It is usually characterized by stiffness of the upper body and quick, precise movements of the feet. It can be done alone or in a group. In addition to public dance performances, there are also dance competitions around the world. These matches are often referred to as Feiseanna (singular Feis). In Irish dance culture, Feis is a traditional festival of Gaelic art and culture.

Dance Costumes are important for the theatrical presence in Irish dance competitions and performances. In many cases, the costumes are sold at high prices and can be made to order. Both men and women can perform the Irish Man Dance, but in today's society the dance remains predominantly female.

This means that fashion is basically dresses. Each dress is different, in different colors and patterns, designed to catch the eyes of the judges during competitions and the eye of the audience during the performance. In addition to the outfit, the general appearance is also important.

Dancers usually curl their hair before every competition. Many dancers invest in curly wigs that match their hair color. Poodle stockings are worn with dresses and dance shoes. These are white knee socks with striking ribbing.

Cultural Dance of Israel

Israeli folk Dance

Israeli folk Dance

Israeli folk dance is a form of dance usually performed to Hebrew songs or other popular songs in Israel, with dances tailored to specific songs. Israeli dances include circle, shrek, and line dances. Since almost all dances are designed on purpose and the choreographers are well known, it is sometimes controversial to label these dances as "folk dances" within the general folk dance community. The recent trend of dances becoming more complex and "professional" has led some to use the alternative term "Israeli entertainment dance".

Cultural Dance of Italy

Tarantella Dance

Tarantella Dance

The tarantella is a group of different folk dances characterized by a fast and cheerful tempo, usually in 6.8 counts accompanied by tambourines. It is one of the most recognized forms of traditional music from southern Italy. The name of the specific dance varies by region, for example tammurriata in Campania, pizzica in the Salento region and Sonu a ballu in Calabria. The tarantella is popular in southern Italy and Argentina. The term can appear as tarantella in a linguistically masculine construction.

Furlana Dance

Furlana Dance

Furlana is an Italian folk dance from the Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. In Friulian furlane means Friulian, in this case Friulian dance. In Friuli, there has been a Slavic minority since the Slavic colonization of the Eastern Alps, and Furlana probably originated as a Slavic dance.

It dates back to at least 1583, when a "ballo furlano" called L'arboscello was published in the Chorearum molliorum collectionanea by Pierre Phalesi the Younger and in the book of organ paintings by Jakob Paix, although its main popularity stretched from the late 1690s to about 1750. Mainly associated with Venice as Friuli was part of the Republic of Venice at the time of its popularity.

Monferrina Dance

Monferrina Dance

Monferrina is a lively 6.8-part Italian folk dance, named after its place of origin, Montferrat, in the Italian region of Piedmont. It spread from Piedmont to all of northern Italy, Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and even as far as Switzerland. It also became popular in England in the late 18th century as a country dance, under the names monfrina, monfreda, and manfredina, and was included in Wheatstone's country dances of 1810. In Piedmont, it is usually accompanied by songs and danced by many couples.

Last Words

We hope as per the early episodes, you enjoyed to read it also J Just keep supporting us, share our thoughts with your loved once; We’ll try our best to share more well researched dance stories with you. Impatiently, waiting for your feedback!

Cultural Dance Series - Previous Episodes Links

Episode 1 – Link: https://bit.ly/cultural-dance-episode-1

Episode 2 – Link: https://bit.ly/cultural-dance-episode-2

Episode 3 – Link: https://bit.ly/cultural-dance-episode-3

Episode 4 – Link: https://bit.ly/cultural-dance-episode-4

Episode 5 – Link: https://bit.ly/cultural-dance-episode-5

Comments

1 Comments

  • This is insane but I like it. I haven’t seen it before in any e-commerce website. I really like this blog series and impatiently waiting for the next episode

    Posted by Lucy Harper | September 27, 2022
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